Depression and Psoriasis

I learned the hard way that depression and psoriasis have a very real connection. Prior to my official diagnosis (and even after), I found myself in some dark places. I should also note that around the same time I was diagnosed as manic depressive or bipolar. My skin disease and my mental illness combined created a whirlwind of emotions that, at the time, I was working through virtually alone. I was lost and scared, to say the least. My friends and family were amazing support systems but there’s only so much people outside of your condition(s) can truly comprehend. But they did the best that they could. It became apparent to me that I needed to seek professional help and outlets outside of my inner circle to talk to.

What’s up with the Psoriasis/Depression connection?

I didn’t understand how something that seemed to be happening on the outside of me could be affecting things churning around on the inside of me. And even when I learned that psoriasis does in fact come from things happening inside of your body, I still couldn’t see the connection. At this point in my disease I was hiding most of my body, even on those hot summer days. I was even hiding myself, holed up in my house, cutting off connection with almost everyone.

When I did venture out into the outside world, I was stared at, pointed at, whispered about and avoided. Even people who knew me would avoid physical contact prior to understanding my disease. And who could blame them? What if I was contagious!? The combination of all these things, the simple act of not being hugged or kissed, took a toll on my mental health.

“An August 2010 study published in the journal Archives of Dermatology found that those living with psoriasis have a 39 percent increased risk of being diagnosed with depression than those without the disease, while the risk of an anxiety diagnosis is 31 percent higher. Another study, published in the Journal of Rheumatology in April 2014, found that those with psoriatic arthritis and psoriasis suffer higher rates of anxiety and depression than those with psoriasis alone.”(1)

After a little research and learning the statistics, I began to wonder what was going on INSIDE of me to cause this sense of sadness. I read that researchers found increased levels of cytokines — a key player in psoriatic disease — in people with depression. “Cytokines are a broad and loose category of small proteins (~5–20 kDa) that are important in cell signaling. Their release has an effect on the behavior of cells around them.” (2) Stress can trigger a mast amount of cells to release inflammatory cytokines and, in turn, cause the brain to release chemicals that trigger depression. (This whole process is, I’m sure, a lot more complicated but I broke it down to the simplest terms so that I could understand it.)

O.K., Great, So Now What?

Now that I (kind of) understood the link between my skin and my brain, I knew it was time to seek some help. For me, personally, the first thing to tackle was my manic depression by finding a professional. (But that’s a whole other blog.) Once that was taken care of, I was ready to take on my psoriasis-triggered sadness.

Here are some steps I recommend taking:

  • Don’t be afraid to reach out to people who might be going through the same thing OR just understand what you are going through. Mentors are available to you through the National Psoriasis foundation. Whether they have dealt with depression or not, they’re just great, understanding people who know what you are dealing with in terms of your disease.
  • Please, please, please find a healthcare professional. Therapy is NOT something to be ashamed of. Sometimes just getting it all off your chest can lift what seems like tons of weight of your shoulders.
  • If this is something you may need to be medicated for, talk to your therapist and he or she will be happy to recommend you to someone who is legally able to prescribe you the right medications. NEVER self medicate.
  • Find a support group. Some of my favorite people to talk to on a rough day are friends I have made through the National Psoriasis Foundation. They’re always just one text or phone call away. You can find their online community HERE
  • On a similar note, find a psoriasis blogger! Reach out to them and I’m sure they will be happy to chat with you and guide you in the right direction.

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Please remember there is always help and hope out there. Find what works for you and stick to it!

Keep Calm and Pspot On Friends xoxo Britt

(1) https://www.psoriasis.org/advance/link-between-psoriatic-disease-and-mental-illness

(2) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cytokine

*Images thanks to http://www.LeafScience.com and http://www.namikauai.com

** DISCLAIMER: THIS BLOG DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE

The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images and other material contained on this website are for informational purposes only. The purpose of this website is to promote broad consumer understanding and knowledge of various health topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment and before undertaking a new health care regimen, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

It’s Just Psoriasis, It’s Not Contagious

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As I brave my winter skin, I also brace myself for the stares and comments that come along with it. As a New York native, I can say I am fairly accustomed to the bizarre and odd things that one sees in this city. Cirque du Soleil on the train… questionable food on the streets sold from even more questionable vans… fashion statements galore… you name it, we have it. But what happens when you are on the other end of the staring?

I don’t care how long you have Psoriasis, you never get used to the stares. You never get used to the moving of seats on the train just to get away from you. You never get used to the questions. And, oddly enough, for a city that considers itself so diverse and open-minded, I think we can be one of the most close minded cities in the world.

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I’ll never forget standing on the street one day waiting for my car to be taken out of valet. A little kid, maybe four or five years old, was getting out of the car with his parents and he asked his mom if she thought all the bug bites on my skin hurt. It was maybe one of the most innocent things I had encountered concerning my disease. He didn’t mean anything by it and it was almost sweet. But the way it hit me and hurt me will never leave me. Kids can be so innocent and so raw.

Walking by unusual people every day never bothered me. It still doesn’t. But to suddenly be my own little side show was surprising to me. I never really saw it that way but I was this little freak roaming the streets of New York. I didn’t fit in! And all because of my SKIN!

I think my point is… take it with a grain of salt. Try not to slide your sleeves down to make people feel comfortable, or sit by yourself on the train away from everyone intentionally. If someone has an issue with your skin, let them ask you about it. You’ll be surprised how many people will sigh when you say, “it’s just psoriasis. it’s not contagious.”

Winter And Your Skin: 7 Tips to Helping Your Psoriasis

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As most Psoriasis patients know, winter can be the hardest month to bare. In the three years that I have had Psoriasis, I notice that the fall and winter season has not been kind to my skin. But why?

According to the National Psoriasis Foundation* “A combination of dry air, decreased sunlight exposure, and colder temperatures can all contribute to winter psoriasis flares. Frequent moisturizing and use of a home humidifier can help alleviate some of the symptoms. Discuss with your doctor possible treatments to control your psoriasis in the winter.”

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I DO suggest you consult your physician but here are some things that help me during the snowy months:

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1- Moisturize, Moisturize, Moisturize.

Keep your skin moist to ease the pain, redness and scaling. The thicker the cream or ointment, the better it is at locking water into your skin. Use moisturizing soap and a creamy lotion after you shower. I use fragrance-free products like baby lotion or Aveeno.

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2- Choose soothing baths over hot showers.

I know, I know. I hate baths too but they really do help. Long showers in hot water remove moisture from your skin. If you are going to shower, shower in warm water just long enough to soap up and rinse off. (Use gentle soaps like baby soap or soaps with Tar in them- I love Grandpa Brand Soaps personally) If you choose a bath, Sprinkle finely ground oatmeal (they sell them in packets at the drug store), Epsom Salts or Dead Sea salts. Make sure the bath is WARM not hot and soak for about 15 minutes to slough off scales, soothe itching, and, most importantly, unwind. Apply moisturizing cream or lotion right after to lock the water in.

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3- Use a humidifier.

While a humidifier doesn’t work for me personally because my room is a hot box as it is, I do recommend it. To wake up with smooth skin, use a device to keep indoor air moist. Make sure you clean the humidifier or bacteria will build up and that helps no one.

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4- Wear soft layers.

Cold weather and wind can irritate your skin and trigger flare-ups. They can also make psoriasis in your joints more painful. Bundle up in a soft scarf, hat, and gloves when you go outside to protect exposed areas of skin. Dress in layers you can peel off to avoid getting too hot — sweating can make psoriasis worse. Choose cotton over wool, denim, and other fabrics that are more likely to bother your skin. When I put on creams before bed, I like to keep a pair or two of psoriasis- friendly pajamas so I don’t worry about stains.

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5- Drink water.

To pump up moisture, drink plenty of water. You’ll know if you’re getting enough because your urine will be a pale yellow. Drinking 8, 8oz cups of water is not only recommended for daily use in general but it also helps your skin. If your urine is bright yellow or dark-colored, you may need more water.

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6- Ease stress.

I know it’s hard, the winter holidays are full of cheer but also full of stress. Stress, in my experience, always makes my psoriasis worse. Plan time to relax. A massage wouldn’t hurt if you can afford it (or have a loving partner who is willing to exercise his or her hands). Exercise also helps. So get that workout in and grab a loving massage.

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7- Consult your doctor.

If nothing seems to be working, please consult your doctor. There are many options. I personally love UV Therapy but leave it to your doctor to decide what is best for you.

 

So grab that nice, soothing bath… lotion up… toss that humidifier on high and grab that massage you deserve. The holidays are for celebrating, not for skin flaking.

Goodbye Black Clothes: A Love Poem ?

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Goodbye black clothes,
Wherever you are.
Trapped in my closet,
The trunk of my car?

Goodbye black clothes,
That I’ve tucked away.
The depths of my drawers,
In bins, where I can’t say.

Goodbye black clothes,
That collect all my flakes.
I’ll never see you,
On one of my dates.

Goodbye black clothes,
I’ve loved you so much.
Your smell from the dryer,
Your soft, gentle touch.

Goodbye black clothes,
It’s great when it lasts.
Too bad I have skin,
Covered in plaques.

You Get A Giveaway! You Get A Giveaway! Everyone Gets A Giveaway!

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So, FREE stuff rocks.

With that said, I’m having my first giveaway soon! Thanks to Etsy and all the absolutely amazing people working so hard on there, I’m happy to say that I’ll be giving away at least 5 really amazing travel packages. Why?

Well, I travel a lot. And it’s been really tough on my body and my skin. A lot of the time I carry my bag on just because it’s easier (or because I’m cheap and not paying $25!!) – so I know if I bring my creams and medicines and special shampoos, I risk having them tossed.

In the near future I’ll be posting a blog about traveling with psoriasis and to the first 5 people who post a picture of their psoriasis or their battle with psoriasis on my Facebook page …. Facebook.com/SeeingPspots … I will be sending you a toiletry bag (I have men’s and women’s, don’t worry) with creams and oils and soaps and lots of fun stuff to bring on your next trip.

I’ll be in touch soon but for now LIKE my Facebook and follow me. I’ll let you know a week in advance when this will take place.

Hugs and Love to you All!

#KeepCalmAndSpotOn

 

Just Face It!

So, I’ve had psoriasis for over a year now. For some reason it seems to pop up more in the spring/summer time than in the fall/winter months (don’t ask me why, it’s usually the opposite for most people).

Anyway, it started on my face this time which is the FIRST TIME it’s ever been on my face. I suppose it was bound to happen at some point. It’s hard to have psoriasis pop up on places that are hard to hide (likkeeeeee my face, unless I wear a mask or stocking over it but I don’t plan on robbing a bank anytime soon). My advice? Just FACE it!

So what? You have a few spots on your face or your hands or any other place that’s particularly noticeable. My whole theory is if YOU don’t treat it like it’s a big deal, then others will react less to it. Don’t draw more attention by trying to hide it. Own it. And of course take care of it. Keep the area clean, put on your topical lotions or creams, DON’T PICK and take it easy. It’s not fun but make the best of it.

*Everything stated on my blog is my own personal opinion and thoughts. You should never take it as medical advice and always seek out a professional physician*