“The Skins”

Hey Doodlebugs! So, today Brooklyn the Wonder Pup and I watched old episodes of Roswell on Netflix (that super old, super dorky T.V. show about aliens, yes). So they have these other aliens and they call them “Skins” because, well, they shed their skin. I actually had to laugh. It reminded me so much of my flakey days so I just couldn’t resist posting a picture. 

 

Poor aliens. We feel your pain. Flake away! 

Diet and Psoriasis???

I have read that your diet helps your Psoriasis. I found what they call the “Anti-Inflammatory Diet” and minus the red meats, it’s really close to the Paleo Diet (from what I can see). Here’s some information on the diet… Recipes to follow!!! =) 

 

Anti-Inflammatory Diet

Psoriasis is an inflammatory disease. Many individuals benefit from following an anti-inflammatory diet to help reduce their symptoms.

Foods to avoid because they have been shown to cause or increase inflammation include:

  • Fatty red meats
  • Dairy products
  • Processed foods
  • Refined sugars
  • Nightshade vegetables, including potatoes, tomatoes and peppers

Foods to include in your diet that have been shown to reduce inflammation include:

  • Coldwater fish. Fish contains omega-3 fatty oils. Fish rich in omega-3s that has been shown to reduce inflammation include albacore tuna, mackerel, salmon, herring, and lake trout.
  • Flaxseeds, olive oil, pumpkin seeds and walnuts. These are plant sources of omega-3s.
  • Colorful fresh fruits and vegetables. Focus on eating foods from the colors of the rainbow.

Nutritious examples are:

  • Carrots
  • Squash and sweet potatoes
  • Spinach
  • Kale, and broccoli
  • Blueberries
  • Mangoes
  • Strawberries and figs

What is Psoriasis???

So to put it super simple, Psoriasis is a skin condition where cells grow at a faster rate than they can be shed, causing excess skin to build up and form scaly patches on the body. If you want to get technical (and I never do because I took Biology several times before I passed) …

Psoriasis is a chronic, autoimmune disease that appears on the skin. It occurs when the immune system sends out faulty signals that speed up the growth cycle of skin cells. Psoriasis is not contagious.

There are five types of psoriasis. The most common form, plaque psoriasis, appears as raised, red patches covered with a silvery white buildup of dead skin cells. Psoriasis can occur on any part of the body and is associated with other serious health conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease and depression.

Psoriasis is the most common autoimmune disease in the U.S. As many as 7.5 million Americans have psoriasis.

Scientists believe that at least 10 percent of the general population inherits one or more of the genes that create a predisposition to psoriasis. However, only 2 percent to 3 percent of the population develops the disease. Researchers believe that for a person to develop psoriasis, the individual must have a combination of the genes that cause psoriasis and be exposed to specific external factors known as “triggers”.

Psoriasis triggers are not universal. What may cause one person’s psoriasis to become active, may not affect another. Established psoriasis triggers include:

  • Stress
  • Injury to skin
  • Medications
  • Although scientifically unproven, some people with psoriasis suspect that allergies, diet and weather trigger their psoriasis. Strep infection is known to trigger guttate psoriasis.

(Source: National Psoriasis Foundation)